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dc.contributor.advisorCureton, Debra
dc.contributor.authorDickens, Clare
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-16T14:10:23Z
dc.date.available2024-05-16T14:10:23Z
dc.date.issued2024-04
dc.identifier.citationDickens, C. (2024) Learning lessons from five student paramedics within their exposure to suicide: a critical narrative study. University of Wolverhampton. http://hdl.handle.net/2436/625524en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/625524
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the Professional Doctorate in Health and Wellbeing at the University of Wolverhampton.en
dc.description.abstractBackground A suicide loss leaves behind a ripple effect of exposure and sense-making. Postvention research and practice has in part focused on professional/occupational exposure. However, it appears to have largely neglected paramedic science and emerging professional/occupational contexts for students who are studying a Higher Education course in allied health professions. Methodology The study design is methodologically grounded in the narrative method. The stories of five student paramedics who self-identified as experiencing exposure to suicide in their emerging professional/occupational context were collected. Positioned as socially co-constructed, and emerging in a post-structuralist world, this narrative inquiry then becomes a critical narrative study. A collocation of sense-making emerges within the discussions and places the students’ narrations side-by-side with the wider discourse and discursive practices which surround and construct professional/occupational suicide exposure, which are then analysed through a Foucauldian lens. Findings Having engaged in a critical interpretive synthesis of the background literature, this thesis has exposed how professional/occupational suicide exposure research is constructed as a problem. Expanding this body of knowledge, the student paramedics’ experiences and sense-making are presented within this study against an emergent plot line of voyage and return, travelling through themes of anticipation, initial fascination, frustration, nightmare, and return, and offer a form of oral history and co-constructed sense-making. These themes are merged and held against a narrative plot line and depicts a metaphor of multiple journeys. The concluding chapter offers an evocative and poetic representation of this metaphor, which has the capacity to bridge concepts, and to extend imagination into recognising new possibilities that emerge from the lessons our student paramedics offer. Possibilities Other avenues of research as well as paramedic science pedagogic possibilities emerge from this study, such as a decision to focus on allied health professional students studying in a Higher Education and placement learning context when exploring suicide exposure. Narrative as a way of knowing, would see us move away from a research and pedagogic approach that simply imparts knowledge of an accepted culture to the next generation of professionals. More so, a student paramedics education should offer sufficient time, space, and place to critically evaluate, to develop better knowledge of themselves and their contexts so that they can participate in that professional/occupational space to transform it. The augmented theoretical and conceptual model that is constructed within this critical narrative study, could be adopted within any study focus or topic of inquiry.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsuicide postventionen
dc.subjectsuicide exposureen
dc.subjectprofessional suicide exposureen
dc.subjectparamedic science educationen
dc.subjectpost-structuralen
dc.subjectcritical narrative studyen
dc.subjectstudent paramedicsen
dc.titleLearning lessons from five student paramedics within their exposure to suicide: a critical narrative studyen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Education, Health and Wellbeing
dc.type.qualificationnameProfessional Doctorate
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
refterms.dateFOA2024-05-16T14:10:25Z


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