• Cyclodextrin diethyldithiocarbamate copper ii inclusion complexes: A promising chemotherapeutic delivery system against chemoresistant triple negative breast cancer cell lines

      Suliman, AS; Khoder, M; Tolaymat, I; Webster, M; Alany, RG; Wang, W; Elhissi, A; Najlah, M; Pharmaceutical Research Group, School of Allied Health, Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, Bishops Hall Lane, Chelmsford CM1 1SQ, UK. (MDPI, 2021-01-10)
      Diethyldithiocarbamate Copper II (DDC-Cu) has shown potent anticancer activity against a wide range of cancer cells, but further investigations are hindered by its practical insolubility in water. In this study, inclusion complexes of DDC-Cu with hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HP) or sulfobutyl ether beta-cyclodextrin (SBE) were prepared and investigated as an approach to enhance the apparent solubility of DDC-Cu. Formulations were prepared by simple mixing of DDC-Cu with both cyclodextrin (CDs) at room temperature. Phase solubility assessments of the resulting solutions were performed. DDC-Cu CD solutions were freeze-dried for further characterisations by DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and FT-IR. Stability and cytotoxicity studies were also performed to investigate the maintenance of DDC-Cu anticancer activity. The phase solubility profile deviated positively from the linearity (Ap type) showing significant solubility enhancement of the DDC-Cu in both CD solutions (approximately 4 mg/mL at 20% w/w CD solutions). The DSC and TGA analysis confirmed the solid solution status of DDC-Cu in CD. The resulting solutions of DDC-Cu were stable for 28 days and conveyed the anticancer activity of DDC-Cu on chemoresistant triple negative breast cancer cell lines, with IC50 values less than 200 nM. Overall, cyclodextrin DDC-Cu complexes offer a great potential for anticancer applications, as evidenced by their very positive effects against chemoresistant triple negative breast cancer cells.
    • Development of injectable PEGylated liposome encapsulating disulfiram for colorectal cancer treatment

      Najlah, M; Suliman, AS; Tolaymat, I; Kurusamy, S; Kannappan, V; Elhissi, AMA; Wang, W; Pharmaceutical Research Group, School of Allied Health, Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, Bishops Hall Lane, Chelmsford CM1 1SQ, UK. (MDPI AG, 2019-11-14)
      © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Disulfiram (DS), an anti-alcoholism medicine, shows strong anti-cancer activity in the laboratory, but the application in clinics for anti-cancer therapy has been limited by its prompt metabolism. Conventional liposomes have shown limited ability to protect DS. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop PEGylated liposomes of DS for enhanced bio-stability and prolonged circulation. PEGylated liposomes were prepared using ethanol-based proliposome methods. Various ratios of phospholipids, namely: hydrogenated soya phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) or dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and N-(Carbonyl-methoxypolyethylenglycol-2000)-1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE-PEG2000) with cholesterol were used. DS was dissolved in the alcoholic solution in different lipid mol% ratios. The size of the resulting multilamellar liposomes was reduced by high-pressure homogenization. Liposomal formulations were characterized by size analysis, zeta potential, drug loading efficiency and stability in horse serum. Small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs; nanoliposomes) were generated with a size of approximately 80 to 120 nm with a polydispersity index (PDI) in the range of 0.1 to 0.3. Zeta potential values of all vesicles were negative, and the negative surface charge intensity tended to increase by PEGylation. PEGylated liposomes had a smaller size (80–90 nm) and a significantly lower PDI. All liposomes showed similar loading efficiencies regardless of lipid type (HSPC or DPPC) or PEGylations. PEGylated liposomes provided the highest drug biostability amongst all formulations in horse serum. PEGylated DPPC liposomes had t1/2 =77.3 ± 9.6 min compared to 9.7 ± 2.3 min for free DS. In vitro cytotoxicity on wild type and resistant colorectal cancer cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay. All liposomal formulations of DS were cytotoxic to both the wild type and resistant colorectal cancer cell lines and were able to reverse chemoresistance at low nanomolar concentrations. In conclusion, PEGylated liposomes have a greater potential to be used as an anticancer carrier for disulfiram.