Welcome to WIRE

(Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses)

WIRE is an open access repository for the research publications and other outputs from postgraduate students and staff at the University of Wolverhampton.

Wolverhampton staff: to deposit your publication to WIRE, go to: https://www.wlv.ac.uk/lib/research/wire/

Use the search box above or the browse function on the left to discover publications from the research community at the University of Wolverhampton.

University students and staff can also search WIRE using LibrarySearch

For further information or help, contact the Scholarly Communications Team at wire@wlv.ac.uk

 

  • Silent sex in captive olive baboons

    Vaglio, Stefano; Rodriguez Villanueva, Maria; Ducroix, Louise; Consiglio, Rosanna; Kim, Ayong Julia; Neilands, Patrick; Stucky, Kerstin; Lameira, Adriano (Brill, 2020-12-01)
    Baboon females are excellent models of women reproductive biology in biomedical research. The two species differ, however, in the advertisement of fertility, including the usage of mating-associated vocalizations. Here, we describe three captive troops of olive baboons wherein, against expectation, females suppressed vocalizing during copulations. Vaginal cytology, together with sexual swelling observations, confirmed that females experienced full receptive cycles. Ovulation did not affect vocal probability during sex, while copulation calls were predicted by male ejaculation as in women (and other primate species). Results cast doubt on the existence of physiological triggers for baboon copulation calls. Social factors may play instead a larger role. Alterations in social structure (as typically observed in the wild) may be implemented strategically as captive enrichment in order to reveal how females in highly social primates change sexual strategies and, therefore, the use of their copulation calls.
  • Sampling and analysis of animal scent signals

    Vaglio, Stefano; Walker, David (MYJoVE Corporation, 2020-12-01)
    We have developed an effective methodology for sampling and analysis of odor signals, by using head-space solid- phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to understand how they may be used in animal communication. This technique allows the semi-quantitative analysis of the volatile components of odor secretions by enabling the separation and tentative identification of the components in the sample, followed by the analysis of peak area ratios to look for trends that could signify compounds that may be involved in signaling. The key strengths of this current approach are the range of sample types that can be analyzed; the lack of need for any complex sample preparation or extractions; the ability to separate and analyze the components of a mixture; the identification of the components detected; and the capability to provide semi-quantitative and potentially quantitative information on the components detected. The main limitation to the methodology relates to the samples themselves. Since the components of specific interest are volatile, and these could easily be lost, or their concentrations altered, it is important that the samples are stored and transported appropriately after their collection. This also means that sample storage and transport conditions are relatively costly. This method can be applied to a variety of samples (including urine, feces, hair and scent-gland odor secretions). These odors consist of complex mixtures, occurring in a range of matrices, and thus necessitate the use of techniques to separate the individual components and extract the compounds of biological interest.
  • Normal wasn’t working for us: changing staff perceptions of what a VLE is, whilst changing the VLE itself

    Towers, Paul (Association for Learning Technology, 2017-09-07)
    The University of Wolverhampton’s current VLE, WOLF has been created, built, developed and embedded in-house since 1999. Although WOLF has been used primarily for learning and teaching, over the years it became standard practice to use it as digital repository, or ‘dumping ground’ (Love & Fry, 2006), for material and content relating to many aspects of the University’s processes and procedures. In essence, WOLF became the University’s intranet, and as the years passed the purpose for the use of WOLF became blurred. WOLF’s development froze and many academics were held back in what they wanted to do and explore. The VLE became ‘stuck’ and academics would ‘stick’ to what they know (Massy & Zemsky, 2004.) The University has implemented an institution-wide transformational programme to modernise and enhance the students’ teaching and learning experiences through the use of technology. The Digital Campus Transformational Programme (DCTP) was created to act as a catalyst for deep change within the institution’s learning systems landscape. The DCTP consists of five foundation projects: Applications Anywhere; Business Intelligence; Student Portal; Digital Platforms; and a new Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The replacement of the VLE is one of the most important technological transitions the University has ever faced. The University procured a new VLE in May 2016. Early adopter courses started using the system in September 2016 with full roll-out across the University from August 2017. During this process, one of the key questions that had to be tackled by the DCTP was: how do you change a VLE while changing staff attitudes, cultures and perceptions at the same time, so that the benefits of the new VLE are realised and that practices from an old system are not replicated in a shiny new environment? To engage all members of staff, and to get them to reflect on their use of a VLE, the DCTP has embarked on a ‘pedagogy first’, using discipline-based discussions as the approach to facilitate initial familiarisation with the new VLE. The presentation will discuss the pros and cons of this approach, and will highlight some of these challenges faced whilst implementing the new VLE. The presentation will identify some of the key activities and processes that were deployed during the tender, evaluation, the early adopter phase and the delivery of the new VLE to ensure engagement from relevant stakeholders.
  • Capturing imaginations: Alternative uses of (lecture) capture technologies for increased student engagement

    Witton, Gemma; Marston, Elora (Association for Learning Technology, 2018-02-28)
    This session will encourage practitioners to think creatively about alternative uses of capture technologies within their own context. Innovative use cases and data from the University of Wolverhampton Capture Technologies project will be used to support workshop activities and discussion. Participants will also be encouraged to share their own experiences and to consider strategies for incorporating content recorded using capture technologies into their overall educational approach. The ideas and best practices discussed may have implications for leaders and managers to inform institutional policy and have an impact on metrics related to TEF and NSS. Participants will engage in an action learning activity ‘Capture Technology Bingo’ where they will be presented with a series of alternative use cases for capture technology and use it to reveal insights into their own practice/institutional practice. Participants will be encouraged to share examples from their own experience and consider strategies for successfully incorporating captured content into their overall educational approach. The activity will also touch on issues of institutional policy (such as opt-in/opt-out policies for lecture recording) and the impact they have on attitudes and engagement from both student and staff perspectives. Discussion on best practices and how alternative use of capture technologies might impact positively on metrics related to TEF and NSS will be threaded throughout.
  • Capturing imaginations: Why it’s important to consider alternative uses of (lecture) capture technologies

    Witton, Gemma; Towers, Paul (Association for Learning Technology, 2018-09-13)
    This session will encourage practitioners to think creatively about alternative uses of capture technologies, critically evaluating them in relation to their own practice and institutional perspectives. Innovative use cases and data from the University of Wolverhampton Capture Technologies project will be used to support workshop activities and discussion. Participants will also be encouraged to share their own experiences and to consider strategies for incorporating content recorded using capture technologies into their overall educational approach. The ideas and best practices discussed may have implications for leaders and managers to inform institutional policy and have an impact on metrics related to NSS and TEF. The Capture Technologies Project at the University of Wolverhampton promotes a shift in focus away from conventional use of capture technology for recording lectures. It advocates purposeful use of capture technologies to create content that is integrated into an overall educational approach and encourages student engagement. Studies at the University of Wolverhampton have shown that using capture technologies to produce other types of content (such as unpacking assessment briefs, flipped classroom materials and student generated content) adds value to the student experience and can increase engagement with the curriculum, which may ultimately lead to a positive impact on student outcomes.

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